Summer Homework & Supply Lists

Below you will find important messages from teachers regarding Summer Homework and Supply Lists for next year. Be sure to refer to the section that corresponds to your student(s) grade(s) for the upcoming 2019-2020 school year. (For example, if your student completed First Grade this year, you will refer to the section labeled Second Grade below.)

Preschool

Summer Homework

Summer Enrichment Suggestions  Preschool, 2019

Social / Emotional 

  • Get together often with 1 or 2 school friends
  • Go to a new place / try a new challenge
  • If involved in an ongoing discipline problem, try writing a contract between child and parent outlining desired behavioral outcome, the steps needed to take to get there, and the reward/consequences for what will happen if the behavior does or does not change
  • In conflict situations, encourage being calm, explain problem, express needs
  • Pick a day or outing where child is “in charge”s/he gets to plan the day, be the leader, etc

Cognitive / Learning Skills

  • Give child multi-stepped instructions often
  • Ask “If…, then…,” – type questions (e.g.,“If it rains tomorrow, then what will we do?”  Or, “If Grandmom is here, how many peaches will we need?”)
  • Play games that require turn-taking and/or listening.  (Whisper down the lane is one, or “I’m going on a picnic & taking an apple.”  (2nd person:) “I’m going on a picnic & taking an apple and a ball.”)
  • At the end of each day, talk about what s/he did; what s/he liked/disliked, etc.

Language Arts (reading / writing)

  • All kids: share the work from the Preschool Portfolio you brought home with someone in your family
  • Go to the library often, browse and get lots of books that look interesting to you
  • Look through at least one book a day on your own, then tell the story of what happened to someone in your family
  • Draw / write with sidewalk chalk, sticks in the sand, squirters, old toothbrushes in water, etc. &/or exercise those fine motor muscles by doing a lot of playdough, legos, etc
  • Rising pre-k 4 students: try to find alphabet letters and/or whole words that you can recognize as you drive or walk to different places.  Can you find a Q?
  • Write notes and send to friends, grandparents,teachers, etc. Write any parts of the words you can on your own, dictate the rest to a parent.

Math

  • All kids…Count everything!  “Eyeball” groups of things w/1-4 objects for quick I. D.
  • Cook a lot, become familiar with cups and tea / table spoons, measuring
  • Use math vocabulary (amounts:  “more, less”; sizes: “narrow”; times: “sooner”, etc.)
  • Find & make patterns (in wallpaper, w/beads or snacks, drawing or building)
  • Rising pre-k 4 students: have a calendar, add the next # each day
  • Play board games that require counting & # recognition (“Sorry”, go fish, etc.)

Social Studies & Science

  • Go places, meet new people, see new things!  --You don’t have to go to a zoo or museum.  Parks, flea markets, the woods, a walk in your neighborhood. 

Supply List

Click here for a printable version of the below.

ITEMS TO BE BROUGHT AND LEFT AT SCHOOL:

1.     A change of clothes including shoes and socks, bagged and labeled with your child’s name, please.  We will be exploring water and other messy materials throughout the year and spills do happen!  (This is a good time to point out that you should not plan to regularly send your child to school dressed in fancy or precious clothes.  Preschoolers get messy and should be comfortable at all times!!)

2.     If your child will be staying for Quiet Time (after 12:30 dismissal), s/he will need to bring in a small pillow and/or blanket or sheet. We have limited storage space so, please, no bulky comforters or sleeping bags. We will supply a rest mat for your child.   S/he may also bring a quiet cuddly toy for comfort and company.  As with the change of clothes, please put names on everything.

DAILY NEEDS:
1.     Your child will need to bring a healthy lunch to school each day that will not need to be refrigerated nor heated up.  We provide milk or water to drink at lunch as well as during our school-provided morning snack.  (MPFS does offer lunches for purchase; please see the school website for the lunch menu calendar.)

2.     Your child should also have a backpack or tote bag large enough to carry lunch as well as notes from school, artwork, projects, clothes or rest supplies for washing, etc.  

3.     On gym class days (TBA), your child must wear sneakers in order to participate.  For safety reasons, we also ask that children wear safe, comfortable shoes on the other school days as well.  (Please, no flip-flops, backless, or platform shoes in Preschool.)

MORNING ARRIVAL:
Your child should arrive at school by 8:20 each morning.  If between 7:30 and 8:00, please drop your child off to the early morning care staff on the playground (or in the Meeting Room when the weather is bad). Preschool does not officially begin until 8:00, once we are all set up and ready to welcome each other and start our day.  Make sure to allow yourselves adequate time to park, escort, help “unpack” (put lunch in cubby, hang coat and backpack, etc.), and check your child in with us. We find that it is helpful to your young child if you establish a quick routine for your departure. You may want to prepare them by saying something like “I will see you into your classroom, give you two kisses and one high five, and then say goodbye. I will be back to pick you up later, have a great day!”  (And then follow through with this plan!) Please make every effort to have your child arrive by 8:20 each day. After a brief period of free play, we start our mornings by gathering together for circle times during which we welcome each other and discuss the plans for the day. Children who arrive late and miss this time may feel uncomfortable and as if they need to “catch up” as the day progresses. 

AFTERNOON DEPARTURE:
If you are picking up your child at 12:30, s/he will be waiting for you in the front hall of the school.  Please drive down 3rdStreet toward Orange Street and pull up in a line near the front walk.  We will walk your child out to you, this way allowing sleeping siblings to stay in the car and you to stay warm & dry in inclement weather.

If your child stays until 3:00, s/he will be packed up and waiting for you in our classroom.  Please collect him or her on time and don’t forget to let us know that you are leaving via a teacher-child handshake.  Children who attend the Extended Day program or Enrichment classes will be escorted to their appropriate destinations as will any child not picked up by 3:15.  

Kindergarten

Summer Homework

Dear Kindergarten Families,

I am excited about our year together and look forward to welcoming you to the classroom in September. Right now, I’d like to offer a few suggestions for things you and your child can do while you enjoy the summer months and anticipate the new school year.

Explore, discover, and have fun! Whether it is reading a book, doing a craft activity, digging in the garden, or playing in the sand, encourage your child to be involved. Enjoy the process, think and talk about the experience, and make connections with other experiences and knowledge.

Read!  Read to and with your child. And, if your child is reading, enjoy listening. Encourage your child to talk about the stories. Predict what will happen next, think of alternatives to parts of the story, ask “What if . . .?” Make connections with the story – for example, this story reminds me of the time we went to the beach, or this story reminds me of another book we read together. Making connections gives children an even deeper understanding of the story. 

Play letter recognition games such as alphabet bingo, letter matching, rhyming games, and letter sound games. You can also check out the Kindergarten links for some fun educational games that will help your child practice these skills.  

Be a mathematician! Observe everything around you. Notice the big and small, look for patterns, count, and compare. Counting activities are particularly great for filling those short in-between times. Estimate (how many windows on the building, how many cars in the parking lot – a small one, how many people in the pool) then confirm by counting. How high can your child count while setting the table, walking down stairs, feeding your pet? Count by 2s. Count backwards. Play games that will help your child recognize numbers, such as Go Fish or Number Bingo. Have fun with math! 

Here is a  book list by Common Sense Media to give you some ideas about what to read.

Have a wonderful summer. I’m looking forward to seeing you in September.

All the Best,
T. Emily Richardson

Supply List

Click here to view a printable version of the below.

On the First Day of School, please have your child bring the following to school:

  • A note indicating 3:00 dismissal routine
  • Two 2-pocket folders 
  • One 3-ring binder (one and a half or two inches) - no paper is needed
  • Book bag/backpack
  • Smock - labeled with your child's name: an old shirt, big enough to go over clothing, is fine
  • Extra set of clothing (socks, underpants, pants/shorts, shirt) - in a bag and each item labeled with your child's name

AND:

The following items will be shared with classmates

  • One box of colored pencils, regular pencils and/or thin markers (16 or 24 count)
  • OPTIONAL (again these items will be shared):  markers, crayons, glue sticks, tissues, empty shoe box, and /or scissors

First Grade

Summer Homework

Dear First Grade Families,

I am excited about our First Grade year together and look forward to welcoming you to the classroom in September. Right now, I’d like to offer a few suggestions for things you and your child can do while you enjoy the summer months and anticipate the new school year.

First, explore, discover, and have fun! Whether it is reading a book, doing a craft activity, digging in the garden, or playing in the sand, encourage your child to be involved. Enjoy the process, think and talk about the experience, and make connections with other experiences and knowledge.

Second, read!  Read to and with your child. And, if your child is reading, enjoy listening. Encourage your child to talk about the stories. Predict what will happen next, think of alternatives to parts of the story, ask “What if . . .?”

Third, be a mathematician! Observe everything around you. Notice the big and small, look for patterns, count, and compare. Counting activities are particularly great for filling those short in-between times. Estimate (how many windows on the building, how many cars in the parking lot – a small one, how many people in the pool) then confirm by counting. How high can your child count while setting the table, walking down stairs, feeding your pet? Count by 2s. Count backwards. Have fun!

Here is a  book list by Common Sense Media to give you some ideas about what to read.

Have a wonderful summer. I’m looking forward to seeing you in September.

All the Best,
T. Emily Richardson 

Supply List

Click here to view a printable version of the below.

On the First Day of School, please have your child bring the following to school:

  • A note indicating 3:00 dismissal routine
  • Two 2-pocket folders (one is for communication between you and me and/or the office, 

  the other for your child's homework)

  • One 3-ring binder (one and a half or two inches) - no paper is needed
  • Book bag/backpack
  • Smock - labeled with your child's name: an old shirt, big enough to go over clothing, is fine
  • Extra set of clothing (socks, underpants, pants/shorts, shirt) - in a bag and each item labeled with your child's name

AND:
The following item will be shared with classmates

  • One box of colored pencils, regular pencils and/or thin markers (16 or 24 count)
  • OPTIONAL (again these items will be shared):  markers, crayons, glue sticks, tissues and /or scissors

Second Grade

Summer Homework

Dear Rising Second Grade Families,

Summer is a great time to relax and get refreshed for the coming year. I like to spend time with family and friends, have new adventures and experiences, and visit new places. I love to catch up on personal reading, view a few movies, take long walks, and plan playdates for my dog. However, before we know it, summer will be a pleasant memory and the 2019-2020 school year will begin. I am excited as I plan lessons, order materials, and consider room design because I think about all of the fun activities we will do together in second grade. I transition to the school year by participating in professional development opportunities to keep current with research and best teaching practices. In order to assure a smooth transition to second grade for your family, it is important to review and apply the skills, strategies, tools, and habits that were learned in first grade. If students are able to read and write sight words and compute addition and subtraction math facts from first grade with automaticity, second grade will get off to a successful start. Try to incorporate and link review and practice in authentic ways with whatever activities you do to generate interest and sustain engagement. I wish you many positive learning adventures this summer!

Please keep a scrapbook or journal of the summer activities or adventures you choose and bring it to school on the first day. We will have time to share during the first few days of class.

Here are some suggestions for summer homework:

  • To keep track of the fantastic summer experiences you have, families might choose to keep a journal. Keep a journal of your favorite daily or weekly activities. You can use prompts like: today, or this week, as a reader, writer, scientist, mathematician, thinker, creator, maker, chef, helper, athlete, environmentalist and/or global citizen I……….
  • Make captions for photos and drawings to illustrate stories about summer events like building sand castles or growing tomatoes.
  • The best way to practice and gain reading skills is to read. Read as much as you can this summer. Read alone, read side by side, and read together. Local libraries have reading clubs, technology, science, and arts and crafts opportunities that might be of interest to your family. Make a list of books you read and put stars next to favorites!
  • Explore new genres or read books from a series. Think of questions before, during, and after reading and think about how the book connects to personal experiences. Search for clues to get those questions answered and to confirm predictions. This might lead to some additional research, craft projects, cooking, or an author study!
  • Make up alternative endings to stories and new stories using the same characters. Tell and record them or write them down.
  • Some families like to celebrate fabulous reading experiences. Feel free to use the reading log codes  that first graders are familiar with to  record reading and document selections
  • Write a letter to a friend or teacher. Visit the post office and buy stamps, too.
  • Repurpose something from the recycling bin. Take a photo and or write about what you created
  • Math is everywhere! Help your child to notice numbers and geometric shapes in our environment and practice math concepts like adding, subtracting, and counting whenever and wherever you can.
  • You might choose to keep a calendar and record the many ways you notice math on a daily basis like tracking the daily temperature or weighing fruit at the local farmer’s market.
  • Have fabulous discussions about math! Discuss how we use math when grocery shopping, budgeting, balancing a checkbook, checking clothing and shoe sizes, figuring out miles, cooking, estimating time, keeping score for sports, even classifying as you sort laundry and put away dishes.
  • Share how builders, architects, engineers, computer professionals, scientists, and YOU use math in jobs.
  • Read some books that have math themes. For example you might want to use Leo Lionni’s Inch by Inch, the story of a worm that uses math to save his life, and measure things around the house. 
  • Play lots of games to help build logic and number sense. Board games, card games, in the car guessing games, computer games, and outdoor games like hopscotch can be fantastic ways to practice math skills. Take photos or make videos of math you notice and math you experience. Can you find geometric shapes or numbers in nature?

INSTRUCTIONS

REMEMBER keep a scrapbook or journal of the summer activities or adventures you choose and bring it to school on the first day. Have a fabulous summer!

Summer Reading Suggestions
Here is a  book list by Common Sense Media to give you some ideas about what to read.

Supply List

Click here to view a printable version of the below.

Students need the following items at school.  Please label these items. As your pencils dwindle and your glue sticks dry up, you will need to replace them as needed throughout the year. 

Also, plan to have a supply of items like pencils, glue sticks, scissors and crayons for home assignments. 

1 five subject notebook
5 sturdy 2 pocket folders
1 dozen sharpened pencils
1 soft sided pencil case that will easily fit inside a desk
1 box of thin lined colored markers
3 large glue sticks 
optional art shirt or smock

Third Grade

Summer Homework

Dear Third Grade Students, 

I hope everyone is off to a wonderful summer full of fun, relaxing, and adventures! While you are soaking up the sun and spending time with family and friends, I want to make sure you are also keeping your minds sharp for next year. I am so excited to be your third grade teacher next school year!

I would like you to work on the following over the summer break: 

  • Personal Artifact -please bring in something found or made (not purchased) that reflects you! Please be prepared to share your artifact in the first few days of school and write 5 sentences about the object, why you chose it, and why it reflects who you are! 
  • Read! I have a reading challenge for all of you! I am giving you a Reading Scavenger Hunt.
    • See if you can find all these different reading challenges on the scavenger hunt. When you do, please fill out and record the book you read for this reading scavenger hunt on the Reading Scavenger Hunt Log and bring that with you on the first day of school. There are lots of challenges on your Reading Scavenger Hunt, please try to complete at least Z of the different challenges and record them on your Reading Scavenger Hunt Log .
    • Here is a  book list by Common Sense Media to give you some ideas about what to read.
  • Write!
    • Writers practice writing every day and use the world around them to inspire them! 
    • Something else I want you to work on over the summer is writing. Write anything you want! Write short stories, newspaper articles, biography, anything! I would love for you to share any or all of your summer writing with me throughout the summer! You can email me your summer writing at: shohl@mpfs.org **You can also turn in your summer writing in a journal too!
       
  • Math! - Click here for the Summer Math Packet. Math students are excellent observers who notice patterns, shapes, numbers, and connections. 
    • This summer, spend some time finding and noticing different places you find yourself and other people using Math! Any time you notice math being used, write it down! Even better, send me pictures of the math in the world around you! You can print a picture and mail it to school OR email me a picture of math being used! 
    • You can email me at: shohl@mpfs.org. Please try to email or send me ONE picture of math being used in the world around you! 
  • Practice! Practice basic addition and subtraction facts. You can use flash cards, play something you learned in second grade. I've included a math packet in our summer homework entitled: Marvelous Math Minutes! There are 10 Math Minutes total, please try to complete at least 5 of these pages before the first day of school. You DO NOT need to complete any of these math minute pages in one minute! Try one page at a time throughout the summer to practice your amazing math skills! Turn in your Marvelous Math Minutes packet with your name on it. We will be using these Math Minutes as good practice for the different math skills we will be working on this year in third grade! 
  • You are welcome to practice typing this summer on our Typing Club. Just use the login you used this year in technology class. You can contact T. Kristen if you don’t remember it.

Enjoy your summer and I look forward to seeing you in September! 

~T. Shannon 

Supply List

Click here to view a printable version of the below.

Third Grade Supply List 2019 - 2020

  • 3 college ruled notebooks labeled with your name and these subject titles: Reading, Writing, and Art
  • 5 folders with pockets labeled with your name and these subject titles: Math, Reading, Writing, Social Studies, and Extra
  • 12 sharpened pencils
  • Science Journal (from second grade)
  • 2 boxes of tissues for the classroom
  • A pack of colored pencils or crayons
  •  2 large erasers
  • A soft pencil case to hold supplies
  • 1 large glue sticks (optional)
  • 1 pair of scissors (optional)
  • A water bottle (optional)
  • A set of at least 8 markers (optional)
  • 1 ruler (optional)

Fourth Grade

Summer Homework

Hello 4th Graders and Families!

We hope that everyone’s summer vacation is off to a great start! Enjoy the long days of summer, relaxing and spending time with family and friends. Over the summer there is a lot of play and learning happening. In addition to having fun and staying active, here are some summer thinking and exploring recommendations:

A personal artifact - something found or made (not purchased) that represents you. You will share these with your classmates in the fall.

  • Read every day!  
    • Get a jump on Reading Olympics. You will find the list of books here. If everyone participates this year, we will have a powerhouse of a team!
    • A novel or book series you are really into, a magazine you enjoy, the newspaper, Newsela.com, poetry, a book about oceans or archeology… just read!  
  • Spend time writing.  Writers get their ideas from life and from noticing potential story starters everywhere.  You could have a story waiting for you in the bottom of your sock drawer!  Keep your eyes and ears open for potential story ideas.  
    • Work in your Google Drive or in a writing notebook.  
      • Some possible ideas and genres for your writing could include:  
        • a piece of fiction (a story).  
        • A letter to your teacher about your summer☺;
        • a persuasive essay or letter about something you care or are concerned about;
        • a letter to an author or movie director whose work you enjoy;
        • a journal about your summer;
  • Think mathematically! Math is everywhere so take time to notice numbers, patterns, and computations when you are: at the pool, in the grocery store, at summer camp, going to the movies, cooking dinner, selling lemonade, playing at the beach, on a road trip (Ooh, and geography too!).  Here you will find a Math Survey with some questions about your everyday mathematical thinking.  For some math maintenance, check out the ideas below-
  • You are welcome to practice typing this summer on our Typing Club. Just use the login you used this year in technology class. You can contact T. Kristen if you don’t remember it.
  • Here is the Reading Olympics list for this coming school year. Even you decide not to be part of the team, there are a lot of great books to choose from on this list.
  • School Supplies - This list will be forthcoming.

Have an enjoyable summer – I can’t wait to hear all about it when we return in September!

In friendship,
T. KB

Supply List

  • 5 folders with pockets and 3 holes punched. 
    • Please label these with your name and the following subject titles: Math, Language Arts, Social Studies, Homework, and Other.
  • 2 inch ring binder for assignment book (I’ll provide!), homework, subject folders, and keeping work materials organized
  • 2 wide-ruled Composition Books
  • 2 College-ruled, one-subject notebooks (with 3 holes punched)
  • Post It Notes: 3x3 unlined and 4x6 lined for Literature Circles
  • 10 sharpened pencils
  • A pack of 8 to16 sharpened, colored pencils
  • Small pencil sharpener
  • 2 large erasers
  • 2 large glue sticks
  • A soft pencil case large enough to hold above supplies and fit easily in desk
  • A pair of headphones, labeled with your name, to live in the classroom for use with the Chromebooks
  • A refillable water bottle labeled with your name (You will be able to fill this at our new water bottle filling stations!)
  • A set of at least 8 thin markers (optional)
  • 1 ruler (optional)
  • 2 boxes of tissues for the classroom
  • Your enthusiasm, creativity, curiosity, patience, ideas, determination, and kindness!

Fifth Grade

Summer Homework

Dear Future Fifth Grader,

Hello! I hope you are enjoying your summer so far - the first day of school will be here before we know it!  In order to get a head start on our year, I am requesting that you complete the following five things over summer break:

MATH Practice your basic math facts, especially your multiplication facts, and have a parent or sibling quiz you on your math facts.  Complete the supplied math practice packet.  Some of these concepts in the math packet you have worked on in class at a fourth grade level, and some of the concepts may be new.  You have all the tools you need to complete the Reteaching side of each page, and by doing so you will certainly be ready to ‘hit the ground running’ at the start of your fifth grade year!  If you would like to do a fun bonus – do the practice side of each page!  Visit fun math sites like:

READ the book, Wonder, which some of you may have already started to read and others can borrow from your local library. Once you are done reading the book write a summary (3-4 paragraphs) on what the book was about and how it made you feel.  Read every day!  Get a jump on Reading Olympics.  If everyone participates this year, we will have a powerhouse of a team!

READ at least one other book of your choice, in addition to Wonder, and write a summary (3-4 paragraphs) on what the book was about and if you would recommend it to a friend.  I would like this book to be from the Reading Olympics list for next school year.  Please be sure the books are at a reading level that is appropriate for your academic ability.  

You may hand write your summaries on paper, or type them up.  Please bring in a copy on September 4th. 

You are welcome to practice typing this summer on our Typing Club. Just use the login you used this year in technology class. You can contact T. Kristen if you don’t remember it.

Collect pictures (photographs, magazine clippings, etc.) to glue on to your pizza box at the start of school. This pizza box will serve as a place to keep your projects and completed assignments throughout the school year. 

Personal Artifact- something found or made (not purchased) that represents you with a written paragraph about this item. (What about you does it symbolize) You will share these with your classmates during the first few days of school.  You may handwrite your paragraph on paper, or type them up and bring in a copy. 

Handwrite or type the answers to the following questions:

  1. At what age/grade did you come to Media Providence Friends School? 
  2. To date, what’s your most memorable moment while at MPFS?  Tell what happened.  (If you are new to MPFS, what are you looking forward to doing?)
  3. What do you like best about school? Least about school? Tell why.
  4. Who is your role model? Tell why.
  5. What is the title of your favorite book?  Tell why this book is your favorite
  6. What do you see yourself doing as a grown-up?  Tell why.
  7. What five adjectives would you use to describe yourself?  Would your friends or family use different words?  What might those words be?

Please bring your completed math packet, book summaries, answers to the above questions, and items from the supplies list to the first day of school.   

Assignment for Parents No one knows your child better than you do.  As a parent, your perception of your child is a valuable resource.  The more we know and understand about your child, the more effective we can be as teachers.

We would appreciate your participation in a “parent homework assignment” that will be of great value to me.  Between now and the beginning of the school year, please write a letter about your child in a million words or less. 

You might want to include a brief biography, problems, special abilities, fears, strengths, weaknesses, and past school experiences.   You might also want to tell us about your expectations for this school year: for the teacher, your child, and the school.  

Thank you for taking part in this assignment.  All letters will be kept confidential.

Enjoy your summer!

P.S. from Teacher Laura…

At MPFS we offer free training in the fall for 4th-7th grade students who would like to be Peer Facilitators. These students are role models for our entire school community in Helping Characteristics: Acceptance, Caring, Trustworthiness, and Understanding. We are sharing the dates now so that you can ask your child if they are interested in pursuing this after school training. Also, if your child has already been trained, they can volunteer to be a trainer of the new students taking this course. 

We will be training new facilitators 3:15-4:30 on the following 4 dates: Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 10, 17.  

Students must attend all 4 dates to have completed training and become a Peer Facilitator at our school. 

 

Supply List

Click here to view a printable version of the below.

1. Small pencil box filled with:
Colored pencils
Crayons
Pencils (10) with erasers
A small pencil sharpener

2. Post-its –3x3 unlined packs and 4x6 lined packs.

3. A homework binder so everything stays organized and in one place. The binder should have at least a 2 inch metal ring to fit everything in it.

4. 2 Composition notebooks, wide-ruled. (not the spiral bound)

5. 2 Boxes (at least) of tissues to contribute to our classroom supply

Middle School

Summer Homework

Dear Middle School Friends,

We hope that you are having an enjoyable and enriching summer.  You accomplished a great deal during the school year, and now it is time to relax and refresh.  As you know, the summer will go by quickly.  So, in preparation for next year in middle school, there is some summer homework we are asking you complete, in order to maintain your skills as well as add to the enjoyment of the summer.

Here you will find information about summer work, next year’s Supply List and other opportunities.  Please read everything carefully so that you can plan accordingly.   Also, if you are new to Middle School, there will be a New Student and Parent Orientation from 2-3 PM on Thursday, August 29th in the Meeting Room of the school.  Please mark your calendars now. 

Sincerely,
Your Middle School Teachers

Humanities: Middle schoolers must read the two books listed below, depending on their grade level.  

In addition to the two required books, students may choose whatever books they like, to get to 1,000 pages total this summer.  (E.g. if the required books total 500 pages, then they may choose any books that they like for the remaining 500 pages.)

Students are required to keep a log of what they've read, including the title of the book, the name of the author, and the number of pages.  Students may use this Summer Reading Log make their own google doc, or hand write on loose leaf.   Parents will need to sign the log which will be collected during the first week of school, as an assignment.

The required books are: 
Rising 6th Grade: Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk
Zack Delacruz: Me and My Big Mouth by Jeff Anderson

Rising 7th Grade: Hour of the Bees by Lindsay Eagar
Dreamland Burning by Jennifer Latham

Rising 8th Grade: The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Code of Honor by Alan Gratz

Math:  Middle School students need to complete 10 hours of Khan Academy. Click here for additional instructions.

Spanish: Click here for Spanish summer homework and resources.

Technology: Students may practice typing this summer by going to Typing Club. They will receive 10 points of extra credit for every hour that they type over the summer, up to 4 hours or 40 points.

Reading Olympics: If you are interested in joining the Reading Olympics program when school starts, I highly suggest that you choose some titles from the Reading Olympics book list found here

As you read your books, make a list that you keep on the computer and can print and bring to school with you in September. Have one of your parents sign for each reading that you record. Remember to bring this list on the first day of school.  

Peer Facilitators: At MPFS we offer free training in the fall for 4th-8th Grade students who would like to be Peer Facilitators throughout the school year. These students are role models for our entire school community in Helping Characteristics: Acceptance, Caring, Trustworthiness and Understanding. We are sharing the dates now so that you can ask your child if they are interested in pursuing this after school training. Also, if your child has already been trained, they can volunteer to be a trainer of the new students taking this course. 

We will be training new facilitators 3:15-4:30 on the following 4 dates: Thurs. Sept. 26, Thurs. Oct. 3, Thurs. Oct. 10, Thurs. Oct. 17

None of these dates is in conflict with a soccer game. Students must attend all 4 dates to have completed training and become a Peer Facilitator at our school. 

Supply List

Click here to view a printable version of the below.

BACKPACK—large enough for books and binder

BINDER-RELATED

  • A large zippered binder (Various subjects)
  • 1 inch 3 ring binders (Math)
  • 1 half-inch binder (Humanities)
  • A pencil case that fits in the binder
  • 2 packages of 5 tabbed notebook dividers in each package (Math and Science)
  • 5 3-hole plastic pocket folders (Various subjects)

ACCESSORIES

  • 6th, 7th & 8th Grades: Chromebook sleeve (Chromebook is called N22)
    Recommend: Zikee 11-11.6 Inch Laptop Sleeve, Zikee Water Resistant Thickest Protective Slim Laptop Case $8.99 on Amazon
    Recommended cases (available at Amazon):
  • Earbuds OR headphones for Chromebook in a plastic ziplock bag w/your name labeled to stay at school - students MUST have these for various classes and will NOT have access to borrowed ones
  • One extra large book sock (Science)
  • Locker magnets (to hang schedule in locker and photos, if desired)

PAPER PRODUCTS

  • 500 sheets of college ruled filler paper (Math)
  • Composition notebook (Humanities)
  • 3 packages of 3x3 sticky notes (Humanities)
  • 3 packages of small post-it notes (Humanities)
  • 3 packages of 3x5 cards (Spanish and Humanities)

UTENSILS

  • Sharpened pencils (100 for the year) - boxes labeled with their names
  • Pencil cap erasers
  • Four different colored highlighters (Math)
  • One set of pens: a blue or black pen and another colored pen (Science)  
  • Small hand held pencil sharpener

HOME SUPPLIES

  • Access to the Internet
  • Access to a printer and appropriate printer cartridges
  • Computer printer paper
  • Colored pencils and sharpener
  • Ruler
  • Markers
  • Tape and glue
  • Poster boards (3)
  • A stapler